Open 361 Days a Year: Admissions 10:00am – 3:30pm; park closes at 4:30pm

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Reservations are not required, and tickets do not need to be purchased online in advance.

Timber Rattlesnake

Timber Rattlesnake

Crotalus horridus

Appearance: Known for its triangular head, slanted eyes and elliptical pupils, the timber rattlesnake is venomous. Large and stocky, rattlesnakes often measure between three and six feet long. Rattlesnakes in this region can be identified as yellow phase (yellow or tan with black or brown cross-bands) or black phase (almost solid black with darker patterns). When frightened by potential predators, they will vibrate the tip of their tail to create the well-known “rattling” sound. As members of the pit viper family, rattlesnakes can also be identified by the pits or heat-sensitive organs located between their nostrils and eyes. They use these pits to detect body heat of both prey and potential danger.

Range: Timber rattlesnakes are common in the mountains and forested areas. Populations are highly susceptible to human activity. To help protect rattlesnake populations, avoid relocating individual species, protect habitats, and do not disturb den sites. To avoid unwanted interactions, always be aware of your surroundings when you are hiking. Despite their reputation, rattlesnakes prefer not to bite. Their initial defense mechanisms are to lay motionless, camouflage with their surroundings, flee, or warn off predators by “rattling.”

Diet: The rattlesnakes’ camouflaged patterns are especially important for successful hunting tactics. As sit-and-wait predators, rattlesnakes will blend into their surroundings, wait in an ambush position, capture their prey and kill it by injecting venom. Their carnivorous diets consist mostly of small mammals and occasionally birds.

Mica

Date of Birth: 2017

Our timber rattlesnake came to the WNC Nature Center in December 2021. She was confiscated by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency after being used in snake handling during religious ceremonies. Mica is a less common dark phase rattlesnake with a black head.

Meet our other animals

American Black Bear

American Black Bear

Generally shy and reclusive animals, black bears avoid human contact and are not normally aggressive. Two black bears, Uno and Ursa, live at the Nature Center.

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Red Wolf Karma

American Red Wolf

Red wolves are highly endangered species that has been eliminated from almost all of its natural range. Our breeding pair of red wolves, Oak and Gloria, are part of the AZA Species Survival Plan.

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American Pygmy Goat

American Pygmy Goat

Similar to the Nigerian dwarf goat, the American pygmy is a small goat that only reaches 1-2 feet in height. They vary widely in coloration including white, tan, caramel, gray, and black.

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